Powerful Social Justice Statements Made by General Assembly 2021

In her final service to UUFKC, Intern Minister Alison attended Unitarian Universalist General Assembly (all online) as our delegate, proudly voting for Rev. Sam Trumbore for Unitarian Universalist Association (UUA) Board of Trustees, as well as for the Statement of Conscience and Social Witness Statements passed by General Assembly.

Statements of Conscience come as the result of a multi-year process of study on an issue voted on by General Assembly. Following the study period the UUA Commission on Social Witness drafts a Statement of Conscience that is voted on by the General Assembly and articulates a mandate for the UUA to focus their efforts and put resources toward achieving its aims. This year’s Statement of Conscience Undoing Systemic White Supremacy: A Call to Prophetic Action, passed with 93% of the vote despite small but vocal opposition to the idea that white supremacy is a problem in our nation or our Association. This is a victory and a mandate for the anti-racist efforts of our denomination. Let’s stay active in this faithful work at UUFKC by reading the statement and continuing to implement it in our congregation!

Actions of Immediate Witness (AIWs) are non-binding statements of the will of the General Assembly at which they are passed. However, they express important priorities shared by our fellow UUs representing congregations across the nation and the world, and must be passed with a 2/3 majority of the vote. This year’s AIWs include some issues near and dear to the heart of our congregation:

Together Again! Our 1st & Last In-Person Gathering of the 2020/21 Church Year

On Sunday, June 27th, after a 16-month endurance of ZOOM services, we met face-to-face at Wiard Park (with masks). As we did, butterflies flitted about; also song birds. (Enchanting!)

Out-going board chair, Franny Howes, held an abbreviated service (no candles or flammables, per ordinance), and extended thanks to our 2020-2021 volunteers.

She announced individuals’ names for all committees: Worship, Stewardship/Finance, Social Justice, Property Task Force, UUFKC Board, Garden Task Force. Marilynn Sutherland, who stepped down as treasurer due to health issues was “held in our hearts. Thank you for your efforts & wisdom. So deeply missed.”

Franny welcomed new board members Faith Leith, Jerry Brown, and Julia Jackman. Julia stepped up early as Treasurer, due to Marilynn’s health issues.

Franny shared one word to come out of the COVID-19 experience, RESILIENCE!! (And what a gift it is!) With the thermometer rising, Chuck Wells had the final word: “Last one standing gets to carry others to their vehicles.”

–Barbara Turk, Archivist

July Chronicles by Barbara

On a sad note, we lost a friend, Glenn Justus, in March. A fine
musician, also builder of beautiful harps (maybe a leprechaun at
heart from his heritage). He was a guitarist, harpist, story
teller.

His parents immigrated from Ireland to Appalachia, so his
talents came from both origins. Our Archives hold notices of
Glenn playing for us at the Pine Grove building. He performed
in the region for decades, including children’s concerts, through
library programs.

In April, volunteers across “Klamath Country” were recognized,
including our own Michael J. Fitzgerald, and friend, Marc Kane,
executive director of Klamath Basin Senior Citizens’ Center.
Congratulations!

This July Pat and David Hedelman celebrate 21 years of shared
pastorship of Congregational United Church of Christ, on
Garden Street. Organized in 1898, the building was
constructed in 1932. Good Wishes dear friends & your Beloved
Community.

–Barbara H.Turk, Archivist

Summer Book Group: Ministry for the Future by Kim Stanley Robinson

UUFKC Board Members Julia Jackman and Jerry Brown want to organize a book group for the summer to read and discuss the novel “Ministry for the Future” by acclaimed sci-fi author Kim Stanley Robinson. The book delves into a near-future scenario that is grappling with intense climate change pressures. It is a challenging and realistic look at world-wide socio-economic and political realities and offers up some provocative ideas for how we might change them. The discussion group might consider some of these ideas and poke at them a bit, and maybe consider how our UU community might be a change agent on this topic. If you are interested, contact Jerry or Julia by email.
Jerry: geodejerry@gmail.com
Julia: juliackjackman@gmail.com

Aspirations by Alison: Merry Part, A Farewell Message

On Solstice night, I realized I’d spent most of my day inside, offering my last worship service with you in the morning, followed by RVUUF’s coffee hour and a Father’s Day celebration at my dad’s house. So I set off for a walk, on the longest day of the year, with the sun still bright even at 8pm.

The first thing I encountered as I stepped outdoors was a small bush of yellow flowers, the kind I had woven into a sun wheel on the first summer solstice I celebrated as a solitary pagan, not yet a Unitarian Universalist, 18 years ago. Those first few times I celebrated the turning of the earth felt joyful and maybe a little silly, like I was playing make-believe somehow, even as I was honoring the very concrete, scientifically demonstrable change of seasons. In the beginning, my pagan practice definitely harkened back to the imaginings of my childhood, and while my logical mind at first found this suspect, I’ve come to see that this simply meant I was tapping back in to a way of knowing that I had left behind. Believing in magic, in the power of ritual, of words, of intention-setting, doesn’t feel silly to me anymore, but rather a return to a truth that has lived in my heart, even when my head was taught to discount it. As I walked this solstice night, I plucked a yellow flower and carried it with me.

Later on my walk, I encountered a blackberry bush, many blackberry bushes, mostly done with their flowering, now bursting with fruit, fruit still as green as the plant’s leaves. I was reminded of the theme of the morning’s service, “Coming to Fruition” and I couldn’t help feeling a certain kinship with those little green berries. Yes, they are berries, but they aren’t ready yet. Yes, I am a minister, but still a green one. To have you receive me and affirm me, in all my greenness, has been a gift and a blessing. I can’t help wanting to hurry the seasons of my life along, because it felt so good to work for my purpose and calling, held by and holding this community of fellow seekers on the quest for truth and meaning and lives that express the fullness of our principles. For the first time in a long time, I felt myself living a life that was whole, a life where I could braid family and community and purpose together into my vocation, my ministry. And yet, it is time now for me to pause in being a minister, so I can finish learning how to be the best minister I can be. I want to be a ripe berry now. But instead, I follow the wisdom of the seasons. To everything, turn, turn, turn…  And I am still in the season of my learning.

My solstice walk reminded me of the wisdom of my Goddess, the living Earth. She is there for me, as long as I take time to look, as long as I follow Her whisperings in my own heart. She called me outside that night to remind me, yes, I have been on this journey a long time, and yes, there is still a ways to go. Over the next year, as I step away from this community to allow you to take back reigns of the ministry we’ve shared together this church year, I’ll finish my Masters of Divinity at Starr King. I’ll prepare myself to come before the Ministerial Fellowshipping Committee of the UUA and receive their blessing on my ministry, which could happen a year from now, or two, or more, depending on how the journey unfolds. I’ll try not to hurry myself, as the Earth never hurries, but turns at Her own steady pace. I’ll tend my family and my studies, my garden and my calling. I’ll miss tending our community together. I’ll miss you. And yet, I’ll trust the process.  When we meet again, I’ll be a ruddier berry, less green, pink even, but still not fully ripe. There is a season, turn, turn, turn…

It is hard to say goodbye from so far away. My thoughts, not to mention my physical body, are planted now in Washington State, the lands of the Duwamish, Stillaguamish, Coast Salish, and Muckleshoot, with Tahoma (aka Mount Rainier) out my window, and my father at center of my care and tending. He’s growing stronger with the treatments and pain management he’s receiving for his cancer, and I’m grateful to be a part of his process of healing, though we are told he will not ever be cured. Even in this season of burgeoning life, Death is always present, and I’m learning to dance with Her as well, to savor the moments She gives us before taking it all away. Being unable to deny that Death is waiting, I’m learning, makes the beauty of life stand out all the more clearly. I cherish these moments with my dad, and I’ll always be grateful to you for giving me space to allow these moments to unfold. I can only hope and pray that as I grow into the fullness of my ministry, I will find a congregation that honors my wholeness as a human being as fully as you have done over these last months. I have found ways to hold you, even as I put my family first. I have found the limits of what I could do for you at this time, and you respected those limits and encouraged me to live within them. You affirmed my ongoing ministry even as I didn’t have as much to give as I had before, or as I had wanted to now. A year ago, I did not expect any part of where I find myself today. After another turning of the wheel of the year, I look forward to seeing who we all become.

Merry Meet, Merry Part, Merry Meet Again.

–Intern Minister Alison Duren-Sutherland

Join UUs Nation-Wide for The Colors of Pride Online Events June 14-19, 2021

Rev. Michael Crumpler, UUA’s Director of LGBTQ & Multicultural Programs, writes: “The Colors of Pride is an opportunity for congregations to publicly support equality during Pride month and commemorate Juneteenth. Our goal is to create opportunities for allyship with the queer community, Black and Brown communities, and congregations by engaging at least 300 congregations nationwide to agree to participate in our pro-equality actions during Pride month.

You can register for Faith in Action for the Equality Act, an online afternoon event of advocacy training at fun at 4pm Pacific on Monday, 6/14, and/or Colors of Pride Juneteenth Commemoration at 9am on Saturday, 6/19, by clicking HERE.

June Chronicles by Barbara

In June 2004, a community organization, the Chiloquin Visions in Progress, had the grand opening and dedication of the Chiloquin Community Center, in Chiloquin. As quoted on our Sunday ZOOM, May 16, 2021, from Mariame  Kaba, ”Every vision is a map”.

Let let us acknowledge two of our own for their years of, “mapping” efforts for CVIP,  Sally and Chuck Wells,  THANK YOU! 

We open our Sunday services acknowledging the First People—the Klamath, Modoc and Yahooskin— who occupied the land the USPS now calls Klamath Falls, and its environs.

The April 2021 SMITHSONIAN magazine had an article, “THE PROMISE of  O K L A H O M A—How the push for statehood led a beacon of racial progress to oppression and violence”. 

In the article, I found an answer to a lifelong, woeful question. Why are some humankind so destructive, seemingly obsessed to hurt / harm others?  My lifelong thought:  A baby cries for nourishment & comfort—basically for survival.  Then transformation begins.

From article I learned that in 1893 a former Massachusetts senator, being mystified by Native Americans’ practices of sharing resources without trying to exploit them for personal profit, reported to the board of Indian Commissioners in Washington, 

“There is no selfishness, which is at the bottom of civilization” He added, “Until this people consent to give up their lands…they will not make much progress”.

Many of us know the reality of his, “progress” reeks of world colonization, aka profits for the selfish.  UU’s have seven (soon maybe eight) principles, all totally void of selfishness!!!

Sunday, May 16th, our joint ZOOM service with Grants Pass UU’s,  was, “Abolition: Our History and Our Future”. Talk about connection: magazine article & service topic.  After service, at “chat”, one gent noted the answer usually is the upbringing of any human baby.

Richard Rodgers’ music and Oscar Hammerstein’s lyrics got it perfect in their South Pacific song,  “YOU’VE GOT TO BE CAREFULLY TAUGHT”.  Gentlemen, AMEN!

District Assembly Update: Moving Toward Regionalization

At the request of the Board, our Intern Minister Alison represented UUFKC at the recent Pacific Northwest District Assembly. Like our upcoming General Assembly, this was an all-online event, but instead of bringing together congregations from across the country, District Assembly brought together congregations from Oregon, Washington, Alaska, and Idaho to vote on the business of our district.

The major vote taken at this year’s District Assembly was a revision to the District’s bylaws that provide for ways of dissolving the district. While it is best-practice for any non-profit to include such a process in their bylaws, there was another reason that the District proposed and voted on this amendment: the ongoing move toward a regional structure rather than a district structure.

When the Unitarians and Universalists merged in the early 1960s, there were around 20 different districts, each with volunteer boards and paid staff to serve the needs of the congregations included in the districts. Now, 50 years later, the duplication of systems represented by 20 different regions has become unsustainable. As wage stagnation worsens, and families must work more hours to meet our basic needs, many districts are no longer able to find the volunteers to staff their boards or the funds to pay their staff. Regionalization, replacing many small districts with five larger geographic “regions,” is being pursued with the goal of eliminating duplication of efforts, streamlining our organization, and enabling our regions to find the volunteers and staff they need to meet the changing needs of our 21st-century faith. If you’re interested in more details on this process, please CLICK HERE for the explanation of regionalization presented to the district assembly by our Regional Lead Rev. Carlton Smith and UUA Director of Congregational Life Staff, Jessica York.

Currently, UUFKC is part of both the Pacific Western Region and the Pacific NW District. However, as the denomination as a whole moves toward regionalization, our district is one step closer to being able to choose to dissolve and participate in the Pacific Western Region alone with the bylaws revision that was passed at last weekend’s District Assembly. If you would like to participate in a district-wide online listening session on Monday, May 24th at 7pm to share your feelings about the regionalization process, CLICK HERE to register. If you want to read more about regionalization across the denomination, CLICK HERE.

Aspirations by Alison: Being Human Together

Thirty-five years ago, I met two of the most important people in my life: the little boy who would become my husband, Jamie; and the little girl who has been my best friend ever since, Emily. I met these two beautiful people as a result of the elementary school community that all our families were a part of. When times really get rough, Jamie & Emily are always there for me, to this day. 

Communities are often built in this way, by good fortune and shared proximity. As Unitarian Universalists, though, we come together to build community on purpose, grounded in principles. And yes, when our UU communities lead us into bonds of lasting friendship, we can count ourselves fortunate. But this is a case where we have made our own good fortune, by choosing to be together, choosing to be vulnerable, choosing to go deeper together. We are co-creators with the Great Mystery, as we participate in the alchemy that transforms a room full of individuals into a beloved community.

I made this choice on purpose as soon as I became a mom. I knew somehow that I needed UU — that I needed YOU — even though then I’d never heard of Klamath Falls, and would never have imagined myself as a clergyperson. The beloved communities that are our UU fellowships had something that the nuclear family I was creating desperately needed. Humans are meant to be together, but our US culture of individualism, capitalism and white supremacy undermines our ability to meet our need to be art of strong, connected communities. The more I participate in beloved UU communities, the more I see that the act of community care is a radical act that helps us reconnect to our shared humanity. We’ve seen this prominently in the last year as the model of mutual aid has flourished in response to the pandemic.

It is in this world that I am becoming a clergyperson, and I’ve been so honored to be YOUR clergyperson for the last eight months. At the same time, I continue to be just another human held in this beloved community. Just last week, my dad was diagnosed with lung cancer, and I was able to fly up to Seattle (so grateful to be fully vaccinated just in time!) to be with him as we begin to negotiate what comes next. Every one of you in the UUFKC community who I have spoken with about this challenging time have affirmed the importance of me being with my father and participating in his care. You’ve held me in your prayers, even as you too are struggling, after a year of isolation and now a time of both rising vaccination rates and rising COVID cases. You’ve offered me grace as I make mistakes because there’s too much on my mind. You’ve given me space to be human. And, together, we keep moving forward, slowly but surely, to get the work of community done.

I’m back in Southern Oregon, and I’m still here for pastoral care, administrative support, and of course, Sunday worship, even as I help coordinate my dad’s care from afar. I’m not sure what the future will bring, but I do know that your support is what makes it possible for me, and for this fellowship, to flourish, in the midst of it all. Thank you for holding me. I, too, am holding you. That is the work of beloved community.

May Chronicles by Barbara

Having turned 83 in April,  I share these words of Jack Nicol, who passed 31 December 2020:  “It’s a big job keeping up with a young heart and mind”.   (H&N Feb. 2021)

’Tis May. Let’s remember Mother’s Day.  “Moms make life half as hard, and twice as good.”  (A necklace)    

One gift from my mother was laughter.  From my birth to first grade she kept an annual diary (just discovered) of my young life.  No words of first tooth or first steps. She shared comical moments.

Fear not. I have scrapbooks of unending items, cards from baby shower, etc. etc. No wonder I’m into archiving!

I laughed SO heartily as I perused her excellent penmanship. I shared some of her trials and tribulations during April family celebrations: two dinners and three cakes. (Love that math.)

Seems early on I fell off of, or out of beds.  My first fall at about four months, a bachelor uncle was living with us. He was to watch me.  Claimed he heard a thud, & rationalized a dropped  shoe. Really?  Mom wore sz-5. How much thud can such make?!? 

Not in diary, but definitely my memory, just prior to 2nd grade. A high school neighbor girl was pushing me on my  best pal’s backyard swing.  Suddenly I went flying to the ground.  I was rushed to the ER. Fortunately no concussion or broken bones. 

For my family, the written witness of my early falls, was pure testimony to any wackiness I’ve  ever or will  demonstrate.   We all laughed uproariously!   (I’m certain such will continue.) 

Another written witness was the tale of  2 1/2 -3 year old having to pee, AND unable to refrain from using her father’s hat.  Mom did not clarify if it was his winter hat, or his summer Panama.  (Both useful in Detroit weather patterns.) 

Reading the diary I rationalized that the Panama, set upside down,  might seem to a child, “my size, suiting my need”!  (I  have yet to share this with grandsons.) But, I’m still snickering. Thanks Mom! 

                                            *****

Let’s offer THANKS to Sustainable Klamath and the Mills Neighborhood Association for Earth Day Activities.  Chief Seattle stated: 

   “MAN DOES NOT WEAVE THE WEB OF LIFE,
  HE IS MERELY A STRAND IN IT.
   WHATEVER HE DOES TO THE WEB,
  HE DOES TO HIMSELF”.  

Then there was Eleanor Roosevelt.  In her day some Right leaders blasted her actions as, ‘unworthy of an American mother’. As a  mother Eleanor bore six children, losing one in infancy.  (She and I share loss of a child.)

In reality her entire life is national and global heritage.  Author Tonya Bolden wrote, “Except for her clothes, nothing about ER has gone out of date.  She fought  battles still being fought, and our world is still not at peace”.  (My hope: The world’s young folks!)

Post-Chief Seattle, and prior to UUA Principle 7, Eleanor stated, 

     “HATE AND FORCE CANNOT BE IN JUST A PART
     OF THE WORLD  WITHOUT HAVING AN EFFECT 
     ON THE REST OF IT”.   

Whatever your age, this from Eleanor: 

    “KEEP YOUR GREATEST GIFT—CURIOSITY—ALIVE”
                   SHARE YOUR STORIES 
           FOR MOTHERS and MOTHERS-OF-HEART
                            HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY

–Barbara H. Turk, Archivist