Fellowship Fun Night

Wednesday, February 13th
6:00 pm  at the UU Fellowship Hall


Join us for an all-ages extravaganza as you get to know your fellow Unitarians in a whole new way! Compete at valentine’s-themed relay races, Minute-to-Win-It games,  make a craft, or just eat heart-shaped candy!
Pizza dinner provided; bring a side to share, if you can!
No cost.

All ages welcome, 1 to 101
Hosted by Franny and Anya  Join the Event on Facebook

Julia Jackman: Immediacy and connection

As someone who has been involved with the Klamath UU Fellowship for many years, I’ve known Julia Jackman for a long time.  But interviewing her for our newsletter turned out to be a joy as I realized that, in a sense, I’ve hardly known Julia at all and was so pleased to be getting better acquainted.

Julia grew up in Santa Barbara, California and attended the University of California in Santa Cruz, majoring in environmental studies and minoring in politics.  It was in Santa Cruz that she met her husband-to-be, Bob Jackman after they had both graduated from UCSC. Bob was then accepted to medical school at George Washington University in Washington D.C., and wanted Julia to come along. However, when she was uncertain that she wanted to make that commitment, having known him for only six months, he just waited, another year as it turned out, until she was ready and they took a two-and-a-half month journey across the country to D.C., where they’d be for four years.

In Santa Cruz Julia had developed an interest in massage therapy, and completed a massage certification program.  In D.C. her primary goal was to work in the environmental field, but the first job she got there was working part-time at a massage therapy business. She then also got a job with a consulting company which worked for the Environmental Protection Agency, looking at ways to reduce greenhouse gases through increasing energy efficiency, and then after that at the International Institute for Energy Conservation, which sought to interest other countries in adopting more efficient technologies.  However, worthy as those jobs were, Julia realized that she really wanted to work one-to-one with people and so thought she might do a masters degree program in nutrition at Bastyr University in Seattle.  Bob was in the Navy, though, while in medical school, and the Navy decided to send him to Pensacola, Florida to do a residency in Family Medicine, (not exactly Seattle) and while there, Julia became pregnant with their daughter, Rowan, who was born in 1995. Fascinated with the process of pregnancy, Julia shifted her focus to pursuing becoming certified as a childbirth educator.

Next came a move to Mystic, Connecticut for four years, where Bob trained as an undersea medical officer, and their second child, Rylan, a son, was born in 1998.

In 1999 the family moved to Klamath Falls, where Bob did three more years of a residency at Cascades East. But, in considering the possibility of becoming a childbirth educator Julia realized that it just wasn’t practical. Bob was frequently on call, and as a childbirth educator, as well as a mom with two young children, she’d have to be on-call too, and so she decided against it.  The idea of pursuing a massage therapy career began to appeal to her again and “Four nights a week for nine months I went over the hill to classes in Ashland at The Ashland Institute of Massage and got my license.”

These days, “Bob is Associate Professor at Cascades East Family Medicine, so he is doctor to his own patients and supervises and teaches young doctors, oversees the clinic, and lots of other stuff. Rowan is in Portland now after a year living in Australia, and is trying to find work. Rylan is living in Salt Lake City and works as a cook/chef-in-training at a high-end restaurant called Table X. And I am a massage therapist. I love my work. I love the immediacy of it, and the true connection to people it gives me. I love being able to help people learn about and connect to their bodies, and of course it is so satisfying to give people some measure of relief from pain and discomfort.  It is almost magical at times.”

Julia finds a similar sense of “immediacy and connection” through “Spending time with my two doggies, Poppy and Bella (especially hiking with them, pretty much a daily activity!), and my horses Luna and Jojo. Animals are so basic, honest, uncomplicated in their motives, and so loving,” and other activities which give her a sense of connection to the physical world, such as gardening, walking/hiking, and cooking.

Her involvement with the Unitarian Universalist Church has been long and rich, beginning in Connecticut and continuing here in Klamath Falls as soon as the family arrived. “I was roped into being greeter for a future service by our founder Ben Kerns the first time I attended. He was charismatic and it was hard to say no to him! Over the years, I have served as religious education coordinator, secretary, president and treasurer (at the same time), briefly groundskeeper (I gave that up quickly as I could barely keep up with my own yard!), newsletter editor, and general board member. Periodically I tried to escape from these duties, but some crisis or another kept pulling me back in: after the fire, I couldn’t help but ask Rev. Patt and Phil if help was needed; Patt asked me to take on communications. Then more recently, when the great and honorable Sally Wells asked if I might take over her role as worship coordinator, I HAD to say yes…a person doesn’t say no to Sally!

“I have been both active participant in and observer of our Fellowship. I have seen it grow and diminish, and loved it and its people, and been frustrated by it. I don’t have a favorite sermon, but one of the best memories is of when we had the Tibetan Monks come and create a mandala in the center of our sanctuary. It was the most amazing and beautiful experience watching these souls praying, chanting and creating a beautiful and very intricate sand mandala, and then deliberately demolish it after blessing it with prayers of peace. That was a very meaningful lesson about the impermanence of all things. More recently, I have really enjoyed hearing Bill Martin’s services. Thanks Phil for bringing him in initially! 

“While I loved our old site and building, the fire was a blessing in disguise. We had become, in my opinion, more attached to the building and location than to the reality and potential of our fellowship. Caring for that building was ultimately a restriction to our growth; it was a lot of work and required more time and money than we could provide. Relocating to downtown has opened a lot of doors and opportunities for us. I like that we are sharing space with another faith community but I would like to someday see us have our own building again (an easier one to maintain, hopefully!). I have really enjoyed having Anya as a “leader” these past couple years. She has been so good for the Fellowship in terms of improving organization and professionalism. I am excited that we have finally made a solid connection to our southern Oregon fellowships. I have hopes that we will continue to grow and become more and more relevant and active in the community as a whole, both as a spiritual source and a place of hope, sanity and positive change.”

                                                                                                Carol Imani

                                                                                                January 29, 2019

Talking with Chuck Wells

This is the first of an ongoing series of interviews with members of our fellowship. Each month a new one will appear in the newsletter.  It’s an effort to help us to get to know one another better. Comments are welcome.  – Carol Imani

Chuck Wells portrait

As long as I’ve been coming to services at the fellowship, I’ve had an affection for Chuck Wells. At age ninety-three Chuck is our most senior member, but he also always has a knack for genuinely witty, laugh-out-loud comments, making it clear that nothing gets by Chuck and that he’s fun to be around.  So recently I sat down with him to learn about the rich life he’s had which, without doubt, has helped him to develop that special sense of humor.

Chuck wanted to know why I chose him my first subject for an interview, and said that he and Sally, his wife, concluded that, due to his age, there was “a sense of urgency” about talking with him, but he wanted me to know that it is “unfounded.”  I told him that reminded me of something Mark Twain had said, that “The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated” and of course Chuck was acquainted with that Twain quote.   He also said that he attributes his long life to three things: “Good genes, a love of work and activity, and a happy marriage.”

Chuck was born in 1925 (“that was five years after women got the vote and one year after Indians became citizens”) on “a farm which backed onto the Erie Canal near Rochester, New York, but when I was fourteen months old my family came west to the San Francisco Bay Area.  The day before my eighteenth birthday I enlisted in the Coast Guard, and became a sailor at sea with the North Atlantic Ice Patrol.” After that Chuck was at San Mateo Community College and then San Jose State, majoring in education, and minoring in sociology and speech therapy.  He also drove an ambulance in San Francisco, and student-taught in San Francisco’s Chinatown, with third and sixth graders, earning his B.A. from San Francisco State.

When he moved to Marin County he taught in three San Rafael schools where “release time for religious education was mandatory” and he recalls one young student, “acting as if the angels of fury were on his tail, telling me ‘I’ve got to go to cataclysm.’“ He also said that, “in order to enjoy the luxury of a public school salary, which back then, in the mid-50’s, was $4,800 a year,

I had to make ends meet by also teaching part time at another school.”  So, apparently, very little has changed since the 1950’s in terms of how underpaid teachers are.

A unique teaching experience came along when Chuck got a job with the Bayview Schools at San Quentin Prison in San Francisco. “That was a time” he says, “when we were trying to rehab people”. Chuck found that he liked working with adult prisoners.  He recalls one in particular, who was raised in a black Alabama orphanage and decided to start over. He started in the first grade, and worked his way through the grades, graduating as the school’s valedictorian.  In his speech he explained that inmates had the choice to be free in their minds while physically prisoners, and the guards were both physically and mentally prisoners while on duty because they had to be continually focused on the inmates.

Chuck was married at twenty-five in the San Jose Unitarian church. He and his wife Marie had two sons. In 1958 he was offered tenure at a school where he was teaching “but I turned it down because I wanted to move to San Jose because we’d met some good Unitarians from there at the Unitarian conference in Carmel.”  In San Jose he taught seventh grade, a class of “educable mentally retarded” students; however, “about half the students were Latino kids who had nothing wrong with them mentally.”  When he told the school counselor that he felt it was “a crime against those kids” to combine them with kids with mental disabilities and to not be taught separately the response was “I can put them in a class with forty-six other kids, but I figured you could do more with them.” So those students stayed in Chuck’s class. “They were a great bunch, and I hated to leave them at the end of the year.”

Around that time Chuck’s wife became the secretary at the Starr King School for the Ministry in Berkeley, which trained future Unitarian ministers, so they moved to Berkeley, and Chuck experienced what he describes as “a mid-life crisis.”  After deliberating over the law, the ministry or continuing in education, a solution presented itself in the form of a masters program in adult education and human resource management at UC Berkeley, and “I took off like a rocket there”. That led, subsequently, to a job offer with the National Iranian Oil Company, in southern Iran, for the next three years.  His marriage ended after coming back to the States. He met Sally. They married and went off to Tripoli in Libya, working for Mobil Oil for 1 ½ years, and “we had a wonderful time in a beat up Land Rover exploring the desert and sea coast.”  That was followed by three years, again with Mobil Oil, in Sumatra, Indonesia, which was “also wonderful, though we were moist all the time, since we were only three degrees above the equator.”

Finally the world travelers decided it was time to return to the United States, specifically the American west, and “we bought an abandoned ranch outside of Chiloquin” and were there for thirty-five years.  Their most important adventure was creating the non-profit Chiloquin Visions in Progress and raising $1,750,000 to build what became a beautiful and much-needed community center, housing a branch of the Klamath County Library and the Two Rivers art gallery.

Five years ago when it became apparent that the ranch was requiring more time and attention than they wanted to give, they moved to Klamath Falls and turned their attention to all kinds of community efforts here, including involvement in the Unitarian Fellowship.  When asked about what he values the most in our fellowship Chuck says “That it grows deeper all the time.  It’s a refuge where you can refill your spiritual tank for the coming week. And there’s also just getting to know the UUers and experiencing their spiritual journeys, as well as the growth

of the board, its breadth and depth, in an effort to provide leadership consistent with our principles.”

Archives JanUary 2019

For my December 9th program,”We never hide from history, we MAKE history”, (Sen. John McCain), I had a lovely closing, from Spring UU WORLD-2014, a piece by Indian poet, Rabindranath Tagore, a Nobel Prize for Literature winner.

When finalizing preparation for that Sunday, I concluded no way
could I end by reading it aloud. Please understand—I know you will.
In follow-up, I’ll share it here in the New Year.

As I tried to emphasize that Sunday, this fellowship has 61 years of making history in this area.
Allow me to share this from a memorial for Aretha Franklin: “It’s a poignant reminder of what we’ve lost, but more importantly, it’s a reminder that greatness is always within our grasp—and that history teeters on a knife-edge, with fear on one side and hope on the other.”

There’s some thought for the New Year-2019.

GOOD WISHES! HAPPY NEW YEAR

Church Chronicles

If you are Jewish, feel free to wish me “HAPPY HANUKKAH”.
If you are Christian you can wish me, “MERRY CHRISTMAS”.
If you are African American/Canadian, wish me a, “JOYOUS KWANZAA”.
If you have no affiliation you can wish me, “HAPPY HOLIDAYS”.

Whatever the expression I’ll not be offended.  It will be the thought that you cared enough to wish me well.   Whoopi Goldberg put it thus:  “We are many things”.  And as David Hedelman shared:  “We all are we”.
 
In this holiday month do keep your sense of humor, count your blessings, and GO JOLLY!!!!!
                               Barbara Turk

Join our Board of Directors

Nominating Committee
This Spring, we will have two openings on our Board of Directors. The process for selecting new board members is that a Nominating Committee, composed of three members, nominates a slate of candidates for the congregation to vote on. Would you be willing to serve on the Nominating Committee? 3 month commitment January-March. MORE INFO

We are part of the Whole!


Solstice Meditation


Thursday, December 20th at 7:00 pm

Step away from the holiday bustle and enter a time of silence, song and reflection on the Winter Solstice.
The Taize style of meditation involves simple melodies repeated over and over in a prayerful way, interspersed with periods of silence. Our Taize-inspired service is open to all people regardless of your faith tradition, or no faith tradition.
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Jensen’s Farewell Party

Sunday, December 16th at 9:00 am [NOTE TIME CHANGE]
We are sad to announce that the Jensens are leaving Klamath Falls, but we are happy for Julie, and her new job as president of Blackburn College in Illinois! Let’s wish Eric and Julie, Madeline and Mia well as they set off on this new chapter of their lives. 
Join us for a farewell breakfast before service. Please bring a potluck dish to share. Kids are welcome: we’ll have a special Christmas craft activity for little ones during the farewell party.

Jensen Family