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UUA Common Read

Common Read 2019-20

A Common Read invites participants to read and discuss the same book in a given period of time, building community in our congregations and our movement by giving diverse people a shared experience, shared language, and a basis for deep, meaningful conversations.

Each year, the Unitarian Universalist Common Read is chosen by a committee including both headquarters and field staff of the UUA. Anyone may nominate a book. Read the criteria for Common Read selection. Nominate a book for 2020-21 using our online form.

The Common Read Selection Committee is pleased to announce that An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz (Beacon Press, 2015) and An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States for Young People adapted by Jean Mendoza and Debbie Reese (Beacon Press, 2019) are the new Common Read. 

covers of Indigenous Peoples' History of the US and young people's version

In 2015, Beacon Press published an extraordinary book by Indigenous scholar and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz that challenged readers to learn US history through a narrative that centers the story, the experiences, and the perspectives of Indigenous peoples. In 2019, Beacon Press published an adaptation for young people by Jean Mendoza and Debbie Reese. Upending myths and misinformation that have been promulgated by leaders and media, it asks readers to reconsider the origin story of the United States taught to every US school child.

In 2020, our nation will approach the 400th anniversary of the much-mythologized encounter at Plymouth between colonists and those native to the land, and our own General Assembly 2020, in Providence, RI, will speak to the truths that contradict the mythology. At the same time, movements in response to global and local environmental emergencies, many involving UUs, are increasingly recognizing the connection between indigenous rights and climate justice. This Common Read invites UU congregations, communities, and individuals to learn the story of trauma and resilience that is the Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States.

If you are not familiar at all with this history, we suggest that you read the version for young people. The discussion guide, available in mid-October, will work for readers of either version. Note: the original version is available as an audio book.

For more information see: https://www.uua.org/books/read?utm_source=Members&utm_campaign=1d7a4f827a-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2019_09_06_02_38_COPY_13&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_4fe96110f7-1d7a4f827a-224627873

April 2019 announcements

RE Committee 
March 9th, 7:00 pm
Conference call with Grants Pass’ RE team. Contact Anya for more info klamathuu@gmail.com


Inquirer’s Class

Wednesday, April 10th, 6:30 pm
What is Unitarian Universalism and is it what you’re looking for? What does it mean to become a member of UUFKC?
Ask these questions and more at the Inquirers’ class. A light dinner will be provided.
Childcare will be available!  

Camp Latagawa
Retreat from the heat of summer the weekend of August 16-18 , 2019 at beautiful Camp Latgawa. We hope you will join members, friends, and families from Rogue Valley UU Fellowship (in Ashland) to enjoy some of the best parts of summer! We want to get to know other UUs in Southern Oregon and grow a sense of community among our congregations.  Reply to klamathuu@gmail.com if you are interested in attending camp!  Camp rates:

YOU can lead Discussion Hour!
Choose a topic that interests you and come prepared to facilitate a discussion. This means making sure everyone gets a chance to be heard. You don’t have to be an expert. This is more about listening and sharing diverse viewpoints!  More Information and SIGN UP HERE

Choir Practice
Every 2nd Sunday at 9:30 am, downstairs in the ‘chapel’. 

Social Justice Committee
Meets every 4th Sunday. Current projects include “Share the plate” fundraising for PALM community dinners. Also, demonstrations of Love on the street. Also, updating policies on our Social Justice partnerships. Courtney Neubauer neubauer.courtney@gmail.com 

BOOKS FOR COFFEE CREEK – info provided by Barbara Turk
The UU Chaplain at Coffee Creek correctional facility is Rev. Sue Matranga-Watson, who will accept books dropped off in her name at the prison.  (She requests only Wicca/Pagan, newer books on Christianity, self-help, Buddhist/Hinduism/Taoism, mysteries,  and westerns, please.) The other UU Chaplain, Rev. Emily  Brault, doesn’t need books at this time. 
Alliance Member Corbett Gordon suggested Trish Brown is collecting books—from toddler to YA books, and especially picture books and easy readers—for children of women at Coffee Creek.  Trish Brown is collecting these books and donated money, but email Suzanne Kosanke if you’re interested in contributing.  (kosanke@hawaii.edu)   

Church Chronicles March 2019

In an early 2019 email I read of a book by Jack Kornfield*, After the Ecstasy, the Laundry.   (Ain’t that the truth! )  “…after even the most cosmic and profound  experience, we go back to our daily lives and tend to our chickens or children, or paperwork”  (or all the above).

Recently, UU Church of the Larger Fellowship minister, Meg Riley**, declared, “Looking at the piles of bills, to-do lists & emails, as tiny, petty annoyances to deal with before I do something  fun, OR I can look at them as gift opportunities for connection, for meaningful conversation, for decision making and creative future design”.

She continues, “It’s kind of a cliche and kind of a truism that how we do one thing is how we do everything”.   “…remember to re-center and inhabit one’s life.”

Rev. Meg closed sharing her practice of each morning stepping out her door (in Minnesota) and declaring out loud, “This is the day I have been given.  How do I choose to show up for it?” As Art Buchwold put it, “Whether it is the best of times or the worst of times, it is the only time we have.”

AND, we wish rewarding times to DAWN ALBRIGHT in her new position as Coordinator for the Local Public Safety Coordinating Council, (dalbright@oregoncounties.org).  

*  J. Kornfield, Vipassana Buddhist teacher

**  Meg Riley, Sr. Minister, UUCLF, Jan 2919

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Talking with Chuck Wells

This is the first of an ongoing series of interviews with members of our fellowship. Each month a new one will appear in the newsletter.  It’s an effort to help us to get to know one another better. Comments are welcome.  – Carol Imani

Chuck Wells portrait

As long as I’ve been coming to services at the fellowship, I’ve had an affection for Chuck Wells. At age ninety-three Chuck is our most senior member, but he also always has a knack for genuinely witty, laugh-out-loud comments, making it clear that nothing gets by Chuck and that he’s fun to be around.  So recently I sat down with him to learn about the rich life he’s had which, without doubt, has helped him to develop that special sense of humor.

Chuck wanted to know why I chose him my first subject for an interview, and said that he and Sally, his wife, concluded that, due to his age, there was “a sense of urgency” about talking with him, but he wanted me to know that it is “unfounded.”  I told him that reminded me of something Mark Twain had said, that “The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated” and of course Chuck was acquainted with that Twain quote.   He also said that he attributes his long life to three things: “Good genes, a love of work and activity, and a happy marriage.”

Chuck was born in 1925 (“that was five years after women got the vote and one year after Indians became citizens”) on “a farm which backed onto the Erie Canal near Rochester, New York, but when I was fourteen months old my family came west to the San Francisco Bay Area.  The day before my eighteenth birthday I enlisted in the Coast Guard, and became a sailor at sea with the North Atlantic Ice Patrol.” After that Chuck was at San Mateo Community College and then San Jose State, majoring in education, and minoring in sociology and speech therapy.  He also drove an ambulance in San Francisco, and student-taught in San Francisco’s Chinatown, with third and sixth graders, earning his B.A. from San Francisco State.

When he moved to Marin County he taught in three San Rafael schools where “release time for religious education was mandatory” and he recalls one young student, “acting as if the angels of fury were on his tail, telling me ‘I’ve got to go to cataclysm.’“ He also said that, “in order to enjoy the luxury of a public school salary, which back then, in the mid-50’s, was $4,800 a year,

I had to make ends meet by also teaching part time at another school.”  So, apparently, very little has changed since the 1950’s in terms of how underpaid teachers are.

A unique teaching experience came along when Chuck got a job with the Bayview Schools at San Quentin Prison in San Francisco. “That was a time” he says, “when we were trying to rehab people”. Chuck found that he liked working with adult prisoners.  He recalls one in particular, who was raised in a black Alabama orphanage and decided to start over. He started in the first grade, and worked his way through the grades, graduating as the school’s valedictorian.  In his speech he explained that inmates had the choice to be free in their minds while physically prisoners, and the guards were both physically and mentally prisoners while on duty because they had to be continually focused on the inmates.

Chuck was married at twenty-five in the San Jose Unitarian church. He and his wife Marie had two sons. In 1958 he was offered tenure at a school where he was teaching “but I turned it down because I wanted to move to San Jose because we’d met some good Unitarians from there at the Unitarian conference in Carmel.”  In San Jose he taught seventh grade, a class of “educable mentally retarded” students; however, “about half the students were Latino kids who had nothing wrong with them mentally.”  When he told the school counselor that he felt it was “a crime against those kids” to combine them with kids with mental disabilities and to not be taught separately the response was “I can put them in a class with forty-six other kids, but I figured you could do more with them.” So those students stayed in Chuck’s class. “They were a great bunch, and I hated to leave them at the end of the year.”

Around that time Chuck’s wife became the secretary at the Starr King School for the Ministry in Berkeley, which trained future Unitarian ministers, so they moved to Berkeley, and Chuck experienced what he describes as “a mid-life crisis.”  After deliberating over the law, the ministry or continuing in education, a solution presented itself in the form of a masters program in adult education and human resource management at UC Berkeley, and “I took off like a rocket there”. That led, subsequently, to a job offer with the National Iranian Oil Company, in southern Iran, for the next three years.  His marriage ended after coming back to the States. He met Sally. They married and went off to Tripoli in Libya, working for Mobil Oil for 1 ½ years, and “we had a wonderful time in a beat up Land Rover exploring the desert and sea coast.”  That was followed by three years, again with Mobil Oil, in Sumatra, Indonesia, which was “also wonderful, though we were moist all the time, since we were only three degrees above the equator.”

Finally the world travelers decided it was time to return to the United States, specifically the American west, and “we bought an abandoned ranch outside of Chiloquin” and were there for thirty-five years.  Their most important adventure was creating the non-profit Chiloquin Visions in Progress and raising $1,750,000 to build what became a beautiful and much-needed community center, housing a branch of the Klamath County Library and the Two Rivers art gallery.

Five years ago when it became apparent that the ranch was requiring more time and attention than they wanted to give, they moved to Klamath Falls and turned their attention to all kinds of community efforts here, including involvement in the Unitarian Fellowship.  When asked about what he values the most in our fellowship Chuck says “That it grows deeper all the time.  It’s a refuge where you can refill your spiritual tank for the coming week. And there’s also just getting to know the UUers and experiencing their spiritual journeys, as well as the growth

of the board, its breadth and depth, in an effort to provide leadership consistent with our principles.”

Archives JanUary 2019

For my December 9th program,”We never hide from history, we MAKE history”, (Sen. John McCain), I had a lovely closing, from Spring UU WORLD-2014, a piece by Indian poet, Rabindranath Tagore, a Nobel Prize for Literature winner.

When finalizing preparation for that Sunday, I concluded no way
could I end by reading it aloud. Please understand—I know you will.
In follow-up, I’ll share it here in the New Year.

As I tried to emphasize that Sunday, this fellowship has 61 years of making history in this area.
Allow me to share this from a memorial for Aretha Franklin: “It’s a poignant reminder of what we’ve lost, but more importantly, it’s a reminder that greatness is always within our grasp—and that history teeters on a knife-edge, with fear on one side and hope on the other.”

There’s some thought for the New Year-2019.

GOOD WISHES! HAPPY NEW YEAR

Solstice Meditation


Thursday, December 20th at 7:00 pm

Step away from the holiday bustle and enter a time of silence, song and reflection on the Winter Solstice.
The Taize style of meditation involves simple melodies repeated over and over in a prayerful way, interspersed with periods of silence. Our Taize-inspired service is open to all people regardless of your faith tradition, or no faith tradition.
Join the event on Facebook

November 2018 archives

                        NOVEMBER 2018 ARCHIVES

The 2018 Spirit Awards have lovingly been presented.  In June the Rev. Patt Herdklotz received hers, followed in October by our own Eric Jensen, and UU/Community friends Paula and Dwight Long.

Our member Scott Wagner was remembered September 22nd by KF family and friends.  In October first-responders in Santa Clara County, CA held a memorial for Scott. Joyce and Justine attended.  Scott was an EMT and fire fighter in his career.

Oregon has a new poet laureate, Kim Stafford, and he has a close connection to our UUFKC.  Kim follows in his father, William’s footsteps as poet laureate. Kim taught at Lewis & Clark College in Portland, as did William.

William was a poet and pacifist and in1970 became twentieth Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress, now known as U.S. Poet Laureate.

Kim an essayist and poet, is additionally responsible for sorting untold boxes of William’s unpublished poetry, private papers, publications, photographs, recordings, teaching materials for Lewis & Clark’s library Special Collections and Archives. No small task.

Kim’s wife is Perrin Kerns, daughter of Ben Kerns. Ben was one  of the founders of UUFKC, and a guiding light until his demise. In by- gone-years, when visiting family in KF, Kim spoke to our fellowship.  

October 13th Lou and I marched with the Rogue Valley UU Fellowship in Ashland’s Gay Pride Parade. Definitely a highlight, almost akin to the Portland Women’s March of 2017, and truly encouraging for warm response given RVUUF banner & marchers.

Diane Triana and Mark London say, “HI” from Brentwood, CA.

THANKS to Barry Gumburt for his meal-assists for the Wagner family during Scott’s illness. Barry is a former UUFKC board president, and now seeks the Buddha’s way.

Sandi Geer was  diagnosed last May with Psoriatic Arthritis.  After months of enduring pain she had a major fiscal pain.  In August she learned her one-a-week shot @ $500 would no longer be covered by insurance. Acupuncture helped, somewhat.  CHEERS to Sandi.

November 9-10, 2018 is 80th anniversary of Kristallnacht, ”Night of Broken Glass”, in Germany and Austria.  Jews were killed and their property destroyed. Too outlandish to have happened?? History IS repeating itself in the mass incarcerations, with no human dignity,  of asylum seekers, and families separated. UU Principle One: The inherent worth & dignity of everyone.

                    We jump from an 80th to a F I R S T.

          Happy FIRST Birthday to Master Raelond Johnson.  

               HAPPY THANKSGIVING  TO ALL

Spirit Award Nominations

To submit a nomination, consider one who embodies UU principles, specifically demonstrates justice, dignity, compassion for others. Submission deadline March 22
As former, annual recipients were from fellowship or community, we now have THREE categories:
(1)  An active fellowship UU,  (2)   Community / Basin person, (3)  Basin organization
You may nominate one, or one for each category.  Submit nomination(s) with brief statement(s) in support, to Barbara at turkiyebabs@charter.net.
Current nominations for (1) total two, for (2) total three, for (3) one.

Spirit Award 2016

Shawn Roetman, Herald and News, Feb 20, 2016

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Klamath County recently presented its Spirit Award for 2015 to Chuck and Sally Wells, a couple from its own membership.

The award is recognizes local individuals who best embody and demonstrate the seven principles of Unitarian Universalism of showing leadership skills, compassion and service.

They formerly resided in the Chiloquin area for more than 30 years, where they were active in both conservation and community efforts.

Chuck served as a volunteer for six and a half years on the Chiloquin-Agency Lake Rural Fire Protection District and the Chiloquin Volunteer Ambulance.

In 1994, the they were instrumental in the founding of Chiloquin Visions in Progress that has sponsored and supported community projects such as Writer In Residence, Chiloquin Learns after School, Two Rivers Village Arts, Friends of the Chiloquin Library, and Concerned Friends of the Winema.

They also spearheaded the raising of $1.7 million to build the Chiloquin Community Center, which houses the Chiloquin Branch Library, the gallery of Two Rivers Village Arts, community and conference rooms.

Chuck put in a number of years on the Klamath Lake Resource Advisory Committee and Sally served multiple terms on the Klamath Province Advisory Committee. She also served as member and president of the Citizen Involvement Advisory Committee to the Department of Land Conservation and Development.

Chuck founded the Friends of Crater Lake National Park and served as the first president. He has also been president of the Klamath Library Advisory Board for 15 years.

Other affiliations over the years were the Klamath County Cattlewomen, the Chiloquin Care Program (Food Bank) and the Central Klamath County Action Team. Sally was also the token environmentalist on the Timber Committee of Klamath 2002 and on the original Hatfield Committee.

Since moving to Klamath Falls four years ago, they have given their time and energy to the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, where Chuck is president; to the Friends of the Klamath County Library, where Sally is secretary; to the Klamath County Democrats; to the Peace Readers group; and to the formation of Klamath Independent Public Power, an effort to establish a Peoples Utility District for Klamath County.

The Unitarian Universalist Fellowship meets in the upstairs community room of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church at 801 Jefferson St. Services are held every Sunday at 10:30 a.m.

New Banner for UUFKC

Anya is spearheading the effort to create a new banner for our UU fellowship. The hope is to have the banner complete by June 2018 so that it can travel to the General Assembly in Missouri, and represent Klamath County in the banner parade.
Do you like sewing?
Do you like designing images, graphics?
Do you have a strong feeling about the identity of our fellowship, and what images should represent us on the banner?
If you answered yes to even one of these questions, please reply to  Anya  anyaclare@gmail.com so she can involve you in the process!

 Plan

The plan is for a small group of us to come up with 2 or 3 possible designs this spring, then ask the board and the fellowship to vote to select the final design.
The UUA provides a how-to guide for making a banner. Read it here.